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Faviconographer: Tab Favicons in Safari for Mac

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Daniel Alm (developer of the excellent time-tracking app [Timing]):

Faviconographer asks Safari.app for a list of all visible tabs (and their positions) in the current window, and for the URLs of those tabs.

It then uses that information to fetch the corresponding icons from Safari’s Favicon cache (WebpageIcons.db), and draws them above the Safari window.

It’s a “hack” — the cleanest solution would be Apple implementing Favicons in Safari — but it works surprisingly well.

Note: Faviconographer does not “hack” your system. It does not inject code into other apps or manipulate system files. In fact, it doesn’t even require Administrator access!

Daniel sent me a beta of this a few weeks ago, and I was dubious, to say the least. But it really does work surprisingly well. It’s not as good as true per-tab favicon support in Safari would be, but it’s closer than you think. And, importantly, it really is a clean hack, insofar as it doesn’t inject code or anything like that. And it’s free. If you use Safari you should try it.

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lukeburrage
13 days ago
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This works so great.
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Roger Federer’s Long, Strange Road in New York Comes to an End

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I had a strange thought about Roger Federer this week. No, not that kind of thought. Let’s back up. Earlier this week, Complex released a video where Roger Federer does that Roger Federer thing — telling self-deprecating stories about his rebellious youth and his life as a hapless dad, geeking out over Michael Jordan, and marveling about getting to work with Nike on his own sneakers. And, then he set off to buy some sneakers for the video segment. Smiling, he took a pair and asked the salesman, “could I have these in an 11.5?”

And I thought to myself, what a thing that is. That Federer is a guy with feet, who wears shoes of a particular size. It’s not as if I’d never seen the feet or the shoes before, but it was so strange to see Federer, a creature who seems to be made of Swiss chocolate, motivational posters and giggles, thinking about something so mundane as feet.

I don’t blame myself for this strange thinking. After all, for years, and particularly this year, Federer has traveled in what I can only describe as a cloud of rapture. I have to think at least three-quarters of his interactions as a professional tennis player consist of people waxing rhapsodic at him about his own greatness. Just a couple of days ago, he stopped by the ESPN set for a post-match interview, and the interview seemed to consist of a little bit of talk about his match, and then the other questions which can best be summed up as “how do you like New York?” “did you see any shows?” “do you remember that time you came here and told us about how you cried at a Broadway show and how disarming that was?” “what do you think of the ladies’ match that we’re cutting away from to talk to you?” “let’s make sure we reference your prediction during the rest of this match, because you’re really great.” I don’t blame the ESPN crew — this is pretty much standard operating procedure for much of the Federer coverage these days. It’s not necessarily unwarranted — he is oddly disarming — but it is poor preparation for thinking of Federer as, well, a guy with size 11.5 feet.

Embed from Getty Images

But, against Juan Martin del Potro at the US Open, Federer often looked like a guy with feet, feet of clay, as the expression goes. It was his determination to win that kept him in the match with a surging del Potro, not the magic tricks that he often seems to pull out at night in New York. Too often, his shots disobeyed his racquet, landing in the net, or many feet outside the lines. And, even his serve let him down — after all, he gave up the first set with a double fault and then a serve that missed its mark and provided the perfect target for del Potro’s thundering forehand. But this may have been one of Federer’s better matches in this year’s US Open — for a player so lauded for the beauty of his game, his five matches at the 2017 US Open were decidedly ugly. The first two five setters against Francis Tiafoe and Mikhail Youzhny would be pronounced unwatchable if he weren’t on the court, and were only called thrillers because too many confuse long matches with great matches. I was there for those matches — trust me, they were long, but definitely not great.

That Federer took fewer sets to move through the next two rounds says more about his favorable match-ups with Feliciano Lopez and Philipp Kohlschreiber than his ability to produce the tennis that started all that rapture to begin with. There were highlights, to be sure — he can’t avoid producing them. But the highlights were separated by swathes of tennis that was ok at best to painful at worst. The quarterfinal against del Potro was more of the same, except that del Potro had the tools to take advantage of a less-than-virtuostic Federer.

I wouldn’t say that the party is over for Federer fans — surely, with rest and practice, there’s no reason why he can’t bring his level up yet again during the indoor swing. But I’ll remember this US Open as the one where Federer was a guy with his feet on the ground, in size 11.5 shoes.

The post Roger Federer’s Long, Strange Road in New York Comes to an End appeared first on The Changeover.

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lukeburrage
16 days ago
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He'll bounce back.
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Nick and Griffin Reach The End — CAR BOYS, Episode 38

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From: polygon
Duration: 30:55

The final episode of Car Boys.
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Polygon is an entertainment website founded in 2012 in partnership with Vox Media. Our mission is to cover not only games but the artists who make them, the fans who love them, and the culture surrounding them.

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lukeburrage
128 days ago
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Go back to episode 1 and watch all 41 videos in this series. It's like they invented and perfected a whole new form of improvised epic comedy storytelling.
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Joy of Tech®, The Internet of Ransomware Things

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2340.png

via the eponymous noggins of Nitrozac and Snaggy at The Joy of Tech®!

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lukeburrage
128 days ago
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This scene is something Philip K Dick wrote in (I think) Ubik. A door and a fridge holding their owner hostage.
josephwebster
127 days ago
Haven't read that one, but it certainly sound like something PKD would come up with.
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josephwebster
128 days ago
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Love the broom.
Denver, CO, USA

May 12th, 2017: Giant Squid is Giant

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This picture of a three day dead specimen, which washed up on Seran Island, Maluku, Indonesia, shows why they named it Giant Squid.
Wiki says;
Quote:

Recent estimates put the maximum size at 13 m (43 ft) for females and 10 m (33 ft) for males from the posterior fins to the tip of the two long tentacles. The mantle is about 2 m (6.6 ft) long, and the length of the squid excluding its tentacles (but including head and arms) rarely exceeds 5 m (16 ft). Claims of specimens measuring 20 m (66 ft) or more have not been scientifically documented.


Quote:

The colossal squid is believed to be the largest squid species in terms of mass. It is known from only a few specimens, and current estimates put its maximum size at 12–14 m (39–46 ft) long and weighing possibly up to 750 kg (1,650 lb), based on analysis of smaller and immature specimens, making it the largest known invertebrate.
But that’s a guess, the biggest caught weighed 495 kg (1,091 lb) and was initially estimated to measure 4.5 m (15 ft) in total length.
Just be thankful Asian restaurants that serve dishes where the squid/octopi try to grab you, use the little ones.:worried:

link
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lukeburrage
131 days ago
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I saw an expert say this is pretty clearly a dead whale, not a squid. Turns out invertebrates don't have backbones and ribs.
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Anova Ticks Off Customers By Requiring Accounts To Cook Food

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Being able to control devices in your kitchen via your phone is convenient, at least that was the case for owners of the Anova Precision Cooker. But many of those consumers say a recent update to the sous vide cooker’s app has rendered their products useless, unless they create an account and share personal information with the company. 

A disappointed Anova customer — and Consumerist reader — pointed out the recent update, noting that they and other users have stopped utilizing the device that cooks food by sealing it in a vacuum-sealed plastic pouch and then placing the pouch in water or steam.

“Like many people, I’ve been using an Anova Precision Cooker for a year and I loved it,” the reader says. “Last week they updated the app which now requires an account with Anova just to use the same basic features I was using before. This is a cooking appliance for heaven’s sake. I’m not doing it!”

In the description for the update on iTunes, Anova says that adding user accounts allows the company to implement new features, including the use of voice control.

Anova first announced in a blog post last month that it would incorporate user accounts to allow owners to control more than one product from their app.

“Currently, you’re only able to control one Anova product at a time through a single app,” the company said. “This will change with the use of user accounts. We’ll be able to register multiple Anova products to one account.”

Other benefits, the company claims, includes the ability to save custom cooks and improve customer support through the app.

However, owners of the Anova Precision Cooker say that requiring user accounts is turning them off the device altogether.

“Talk about a great way for a company to ruin their own, previously loved product,” the Consumerist reader said.

Others shared their dissatisfaction with the change on Anova’s blog, Twitter account, and the app’s iTunes page.

“If you want to require a user to log in for some features, that should be optional,” another owner wrote on the blog. “As it stands, my Precision Cooker is useless as I won’t sign up for an account to use an appliance to make dinner.

“This is ridiculous,” another owner wrote on Anova’s blog. “I bought a device for $150 that, last week, worked fine without Anova knowing who I was or what my email address is.”

“The Anova app had been working basically fine, but now they decided to make it mandatory to have an account,” a user wrote in a review of the app on iTunes. “I absolutely hate being forced into stuff like that, especially when I’m not expecting it.”

For it’s part, Anova replied to several customers on Twitter, saying that it would take their complaints into consideration.

Additionally, while some owners say they’ve stopped using their cookers because they don’t want Anova to track them, other say they aren’t using the device because they can’t create an account.

“Don’t take the update!” one owner warned on the Anova blog. “I have now a cooker that I can’t use. It is impossible to create an account. The link sent to confirm your email address leads to blank page and no account is created.”

Update: A rep for Anova tells Consumerist that adding user accounts is a “stepping stone for us to provide a more customizable experience” with features.

The company says that it will never share or sell customer information for marketing purposes and that it does not require personal information at sign-up beyond a username, email, and password.

As for the future of user accounts, the company says that it is possible that some features of the precision cooker could be available without the need for an account down the road.

“Currently, we are exploring a feature that will allow users to opt out of the login process,” the rep says. “There will be an update to the app released in two weeks where users will see improvements based on feedback.”





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lukeburrage
162 days ago
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The issue with Anova needing logging and accounts already happened to me and thousands of others with the GoPro. Worked fine with the app for months, then suddenly, one day, utterly useless without logging in.

Which needed internet.

Which I didn't have while sailing down the Amazon in Brazil! And there's no way to delete files or format the SD card without the app. And no shot previewing. And no transferring files. Etc, etc.

After months of complaints of the app logging out automatically and people's work life being disrupted, and after thousands of one star reviews for the app, and an online petition, they updated the app to allow off-line use.

I have an Anova, but have never used the app, so I hope this doesn't hurt me.
jbuergel
160 days ago
I've had an Anova from the Kickstarter, and never once even considered loading the app.
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satadru
163 days ago
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Accounts would be useful for handling multiple devices... but there needs to be a standalone option without accounts. My bluetooth unit even has 3rd party apps (for android) that connect directly to the device.
New York, NY
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