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Nick and Griffin Reach The End — CAR BOYS, Episode 38

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From: polygon
Duration: 30:55

The final episode of Car Boys.
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Polygon is an entertainment website founded in 2012 in partnership with Vox Media. Our mission is to cover not only games but the artists who make them, the fans who love them, and the culture surrounding them.

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lukeburrage
68 days ago
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Go back to episode 1 and watch all 41 videos in this series. It's like they invented and perfected a whole new form of improvised epic comedy storytelling.
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Joy of Tech®, The Internet of Ransomware Things

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2340.png

via the eponymous noggins of Nitrozac and Snaggy at The Joy of Tech®!

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lukeburrage
69 days ago
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This scene is something Philip K Dick wrote in (I think) Ubik. A door and a fridge holding their owner hostage.
josephwebster
67 days ago
Haven't read that one, but it certainly sound like something PKD would come up with.
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josephwebster
69 days ago
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Love the broom.
Denver, CO, USA

May 12th, 2017: Giant Squid is Giant

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This picture of a three day dead specimen, which washed up on Seran Island, Maluku, Indonesia, shows why they named it Giant Squid.
Wiki says;
Quote:

Recent estimates put the maximum size at 13 m (43 ft) for females and 10 m (33 ft) for males from the posterior fins to the tip of the two long tentacles. The mantle is about 2 m (6.6 ft) long, and the length of the squid excluding its tentacles (but including head and arms) rarely exceeds 5 m (16 ft). Claims of specimens measuring 20 m (66 ft) or more have not been scientifically documented.


Quote:

The colossal squid is believed to be the largest squid species in terms of mass. It is known from only a few specimens, and current estimates put its maximum size at 12–14 m (39–46 ft) long and weighing possibly up to 750 kg (1,650 lb), based on analysis of smaller and immature specimens, making it the largest known invertebrate.
But that’s a guess, the biggest caught weighed 495 kg (1,091 lb) and was initially estimated to measure 4.5 m (15 ft) in total length.
Just be thankful Asian restaurants that serve dishes where the squid/octopi try to grab you, use the little ones.:worried:

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lukeburrage
72 days ago
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I saw an expert say this is pretty clearly a dead whale, not a squid. Turns out invertebrates don't have backbones and ribs.
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Anova Ticks Off Customers By Requiring Accounts To Cook Food

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Being able to control devices in your kitchen via your phone is convenient, at least that was the case for owners of the Anova Precision Cooker. But many of those consumers say a recent update to the sous vide cooker’s app has rendered their products useless, unless they create an account and share personal information with the company. 

A disappointed Anova customer — and Consumerist reader — pointed out the recent update, noting that they and other users have stopped utilizing the device that cooks food by sealing it in a vacuum-sealed plastic pouch and then placing the pouch in water or steam.

“Like many people, I’ve been using an Anova Precision Cooker for a year and I loved it,” the reader says. “Last week they updated the app which now requires an account with Anova just to use the same basic features I was using before. This is a cooking appliance for heaven’s sake. I’m not doing it!”

In the description for the update on iTunes, Anova says that adding user accounts allows the company to implement new features, including the use of voice control.

Anova first announced in a blog post last month that it would incorporate user accounts to allow owners to control more than one product from their app.

“Currently, you’re only able to control one Anova product at a time through a single app,” the company said. “This will change with the use of user accounts. We’ll be able to register multiple Anova products to one account.”

Other benefits, the company claims, includes the ability to save custom cooks and improve customer support through the app.

However, owners of the Anova Precision Cooker say that requiring user accounts is turning them off the device altogether.

“Talk about a great way for a company to ruin their own, previously loved product,” the Consumerist reader said.

Others shared their dissatisfaction with the change on Anova’s blog, Twitter account, and the app’s iTunes page.

“If you want to require a user to log in for some features, that should be optional,” another owner wrote on the blog. “As it stands, my Precision Cooker is useless as I won’t sign up for an account to use an appliance to make dinner.

“This is ridiculous,” another owner wrote on Anova’s blog. “I bought a device for $150 that, last week, worked fine without Anova knowing who I was or what my email address is.”

“The Anova app had been working basically fine, but now they decided to make it mandatory to have an account,” a user wrote in a review of the app on iTunes. “I absolutely hate being forced into stuff like that, especially when I’m not expecting it.”

For it’s part, Anova replied to several customers on Twitter, saying that it would take their complaints into consideration.

Additionally, while some owners say they’ve stopped using their cookers because they don’t want Anova to track them, other say they aren’t using the device because they can’t create an account.

“Don’t take the update!” one owner warned on the Anova blog. “I have now a cooker that I can’t use. It is impossible to create an account. The link sent to confirm your email address leads to blank page and no account is created.”

Update: A rep for Anova tells Consumerist that adding user accounts is a “stepping stone for us to provide a more customizable experience” with features.

The company says that it will never share or sell customer information for marketing purposes and that it does not require personal information at sign-up beyond a username, email, and password.

As for the future of user accounts, the company says that it is possible that some features of the precision cooker could be available without the need for an account down the road.

“Currently, we are exploring a feature that will allow users to opt out of the login process,” the rep says. “There will be an update to the app released in two weeks where users will see improvements based on feedback.”





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lukeburrage
103 days ago
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The issue with Anova needing logging and accounts already happened to me and thousands of others with the GoPro. Worked fine with the app for months, then suddenly, one day, utterly useless without logging in.

Which needed internet.

Which I didn't have while sailing down the Amazon in Brazil! And there's no way to delete files or format the SD card without the app. And no shot previewing. And no transferring files. Etc, etc.

After months of complaints of the app logging out automatically and people's work life being disrupted, and after thousands of one star reviews for the app, and an online petition, they updated the app to allow off-line use.

I have an Anova, but have never used the app, so I hope this doesn't hurt me.
jbuergel
100 days ago
I've had an Anova from the Kickstarter, and never once even considered loading the app.
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satadru
103 days ago
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Accounts would be useful for handling multiple devices... but there needs to be a standalone option without accounts. My bluetooth unit even has 3rd party apps (for android) that connect directly to the device.
New York, NY

Adidas Stan Smith PC Wool Sneakers

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When you see a pair of Stan Smiths, they are typically clad in leather from heel to toe. But with the chill of winter invading, even one of the most...

Visit Uncrate for the full post.
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lukeburrage
226 days ago
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This post in my iPad app shows how bad the "every image resized to 100% edge to edge width" messes up page layout. I can't wait until this is changed to a sensible setting again!
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gradualepiphany
226 days ago
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Nice, but they still have the crappy new rubber sole :( the old stans with foam soles were the most comfy sneaker I've ever had.
Los Angeles, California, USA

Berlin Is Banning Most Vacation Apartment Rentals

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Looking to rent an apartment on your next vacation to Berlin? Starting Sunday, you can basically forget about it. From May 1, Germany’s capital is banning landlords from renting out apartments to short-term visitors, with only a few exceptions permitted.

The penalty for breaking the law is a substantial €100,000 ($113,000) fine — levied on people renting their homes, never on the guests themselves. There will still be some loopholes that allow a few vacation apartments to persist, but it seems that, in Berlin at least, the astronomical rise of Airbnb and other short-stay rental sites is effectively over.

The transit guide helps tenants work out if their landlords are charging them too much.


The general lack of apartments in Berlin provoked the law change. Thanks in part to German rent laws that are stricter than most other European countries, short-term rentals are often more profitable for landlords than finding longer-term tenants. In a growing city, that has made good, affordable apartments harder to come by; vacation apartments have taken over large chunks of the most desirable streets, and permanent residents have been frozen out of the market. Estimates vary about the number of permanent vacation apartments in the city, with one recent article pegging it at 14,393 units, out of a total of 1.9 million dwellings in the city.

This has provided a windfall for some landlords (and tenants who sub-let on the sly), but it’s less welcome for the many people searching for their own apartments. Locals’ tolerance of loud, late-partying tourists in their midst has also been wearing thin. Many landlords aren’t pleased with the law change, especially people who rent out apartments short-term in areas that don’t have a problem with party tourism. The Berlin Senate’s ruling nonetheless reflects a general feeling across a city in which homes are getting harder to find: Berliners have had enough and they want their city back.

The new laws still don’t mean all Berlin homestays will disappear overnight. People will still be able to rent out rooms in their homes, as long as the rooms don’t cover more than 50 percent of the property’s floor space. Landlords will also be able to apply for official permits to rent out entire apartments short-term from the local borough. Their applications must include a convincing explanation of why they need to rent the apartment short-term, which will be scrutinized and quite possibly rejected by the borough. For those that are approved, the apartment can be rented for no more than the average rent per square meter for the local area.

The changes might seem drastic, even overbearing, but it’s important to remember that the great majority of Berliners don’t own their homes. Homes in the city are thus often seen as public resources first and investment assets second. The new law also hasn’t arrived out of nowhere. It was actually passed in 2014, and Berlin landlords have had a two-year grace period to comply, either by finding permanent tenants or selling their apartments.

In the past few months’ run-up to the law change, the effects have been noticeable, with the pool of available vacation rentals drying up quickly. In February, Airbnb listed 11,000 entire apartments for short-term rental in the city. By March the number dropped to 6,700. The number of apartments offered by commercial operators fell further over the same period, from 2,000 to 1,000.

But does a decrease in the number of vacation apartments automatically equal a rise in the availability of more permanent housing? The city estimates that 1,000 fresh apartments for long-term rent should appear on the market in the next few months, with the new laws expected to release 10,000 apartments for local rent over the longer term. That’s a large number (if those extra apartments do indeed turn up) but in a city of over 3.5 million inhabitants, not necessarily a game changer. Likewise, implementation of the new law may prove to be a headache. It seems likely that some unofficial word-of-mouth holiday rentals may continue even with the threat of fines.

The vacation rental ban isn’t, however, the only weapon in Berlin’s arsenal when it comes to increasing the number of permanent homes. It comes at a time when Berlin is building large amounts of new apartments, with up to 50,000 to be built in the next 10 to 15 years. There are also possible signs that the city’s recent rapid population spike may be about to plateau. This all takes place against a backdrop of ever-tightening rental laws designed to halt untrammelled property speculation and rent rises, although these measures’ effect has been ambiguous. Taken altogether, Berlin seems to be doing everything it can to make housing more plentiful, and thus more affordable in the city. It will be worth watching to see what the long-term effect of all these moves turns out to be.


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lukeburrage
451 days ago
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This is a pity for me because I travel a lot and now my apartment will be empty at home for many weeks a year. However, I know a lot of people who were living financially off subletting their apartment full time while living elsewhere, and that always struck me as part of the problem.
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